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Ministry of Energy Mines and Responsible for Core Review

GSB Publications Release Notifications for 2011

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-17
 

December 15, 2011  

 

New Publications:  Geoscience Map 2011-5, GeoFile 2011-12

Staffing Update:  New Chief Geologist 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-5:  Geology, Geochronology, Lithogeochemistry and Metamorphism of the Nimpkish-Telegraph Cove Area, Northern Vancouver Island (NTS 092L/07 and part of 092L/10) 1:50 000 scale

G.T. Nixon, M.C. Kelman, J.P. Larocque, D.B. Stevenson, L.A. Stokes, A. Pals, J. Styan, K.A. Johnston, R.M. Friedman, J.K. Mortensen, M.J. Orchard and C.A. McRoberts
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Maps/GeoscienceMaps/Pages/2011-5.aspx 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-5 (1:50 000-scale) is the final map in a series of five new geological maps (Geoscience Maps 2011-1 to 2011-5) of northern Vancouver Island which together provide a revised Early Mesozoic stratigraphic framework and Mesozoic-Tertiary plutonic history for southern Wrangellia. Geoscience Map 2011-5 describes the geology, geochronology, lithogeochemistry and metamorphism of the Nimpkish – Telegraph Cove area (NTS 092L/07 and part of 92L/10). The map area is underlain by a folded and faulted sequence of Late Triassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Vancouver and Bonanza groups intruded by granitoids of the Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The deformed Triassic rocks are unconformably overlain by Upper Cretaceous marine clastics (Nanaimo Group equivalents) and intruded by rare Tertiary dykes. The Late Triassic Quatsino limestone thins radically from west to east across the map area, reaching a maximum thickness of ~800 m between Nimpkish and Bonanza lakes and a minimum thickness of <250 m in coastal exposures west of Beaver Cove. Small base-metal skarn occurrences are concentrated between Bonanza and Nimpkish lakes where the limestone is thickest near contacts with Early-Middle Jurassic granitoid intrusions of the Island Plutonic Suite (e.g. northern margins of the Noomas Creek Pluton and Nimpkish Batholith west of Bonanza Lake). The underlying Karmutsen Formation has a minimum estimated thickness of ~6 km and comprises a basal submarine pillowed basalt unit (>3 km), a middle hyaloclastite unit (~1.5 km) and an upper subaerial flow unit (>1.5 km). This stratigraphy is well-exposed in oblique section along the east coast of the island between Telegraph Cove and Robson Bight. Younger augite-plagioclase-phyric volcanic sequences in the area are assigned to the Late Triassic Parson Bay Formation; Early to Middle Jurassic volcanic stratigraphy equivalent to the Le Mare Lake and Holberg volcanic units to the west and north, respectively, are entirely lacking. Major structures in the area include steeply dipping, northerly and northwesterly-trending faults (e.g. Huston Lake, Nimpkish and Bonanza Lake faults), and an intersecting set of northeasterly-oriented structures in the northernmost part of the map area. A major north-northwesterly-trending synclinal axis delineated by strata of the Parson Bay and Quatsino formations passes through the crest of the Hankin Range and extends northwards to the Beaver Cove Fault. Regional metamorphism is generally characterized by very low-grade mineral assemblages (prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies) except in the vicinity of faults and intrusive contacts where the rocks may reach upper greenschist to amphibolite grade, respectively.

 

GeoFile 2011-12:  Surficial Geochemistry of the Galaxy Porphyry Copper-Gold Deposit, Kamloops, BC (NTS 092I/09) 

R.E. Lett
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-12.aspx 

 

In a preliminary report of a geochemical orientation survey carried out in 1992 over the Galaxy Cu-Au deposit (MINFILE 092INE007) southwest of Kamloops, BC, Kerr, Sibbick and Getchell, 1993 describe the geology, sampling and analytical methods.  A map shows the distribution of Cu in the surficial deposits (till).  No other elements were reported in their Geological Fieldwork paper (BCGS Paper 1993-1, pages 439-442). This GeoFile reports digital data for 47 elements, location coordinates for 169 sample sites on a grid extending 1500 metres southeast of the deposit and field notes in digital records.

 

 

Staffing Update

 

   

Steve Rowins is the new Chief Geologist and Executive Director of the BC Geological Survey.   Steve will lead the Geological Survey in its mandate to attract investment in the mineral resources of BC by undertaking applied geoscience projects and developing and maintaining world class geoscience databases.

 

Steve obtained his undergraduate geology degree from Queen’s University, followed by a M.Sc. from the University of Ottawa and a Ph.D. from the University of Western Australia in 1994. Returning to Canada, he undertook a NSERC Post-Doctoral Fellowship at McGill University followed by several years exploring the Americas as a Project Geologist with Westmin Resources and Boliden Ltd.  In 1999, Steve joined the Department of Earth & Ocean Sciences at UBC as an Assistant Professor of Economic Geology where he remained until 2006, then he returned to industry as the Vice-President of Exploration with Northern Abitibi Mining Corp. In 2009, he joined the British Columbia Geological Survey, as the Director of Cordilleran Geoscience. Steve is also an Adjunct Professor in the School of Earth & Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria and his research interests continue to be investigating the key physicochemical processes that control the ultimate grade and tonnage of magmatic-hydrothermal ore systems. An active volunteer in the Earth Sciences community, Steve is the current President of the Geological Association of Canada (GAC) and also serves as an Associate Editor of Ore Geology Reviews.

 

Steve’s Contact Information:

Phone:  250-952-0454

Email:  Stephen.Rowins@gov.bc.ca

 

 

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Most provincial geoscience data can be easily accessed over the internet in map format at:

www.MapPlace.ca and through various thematic pages at www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience 

 

Printed BC Geological Survey geoscience publications are available digitally, free of charge, from this website.

 

Questions or to update your contact info please contact the BC Geological Survey:

Email: Geological.Survey@gov.bc.ca     Tel: 250-952-0372    Fax: 250-952-0381 

 

 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-16
 

December 12, 2011  

 

New Publications:  GeoFile 2011-11

 

GeoFile 2011-11:  A Digital Atlas of Terranes for the Northern Cordillera

M. Colpron and J.L. Nelson
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-11.aspx 

 

The framework of the Cordilleran orogen of northwestern North America is commonly depicted as a ‘collage’ of terranes – crustal blocks containing records of a variety of geodynamic environments including continental fragments, pieces of island arc crust and oceanic crust. The series of maps available here are derived from a GIS compilation of terranes based on the map published by Colpron et al. (2007) and Nelson and Colpron (2007), and include modifications from recent regional mapping. These maps are presented here in a variety of digital format including ArcGIS file geodatabase (.gdb), shapefiles (.shp and related files) and Map Packages (.mpk), as well as in a number of graphic formats (Adobe Illustrator CS3, CorelDraw X3, PDF and JPEG). The GIS data includes individual terrane layers for British Columbia, Yukon and Alaska, as well as a layer showing selected major Late Cretaceous and Tertiary strike-slip faults. Graphic files derived from the GIS compilation were prepared for the Northern Cordillera (Alaska, Yukon and BC), the Canadian Cordillera (BC and Yukon), Yukon, and British Columbia. These maps are intended for page-size display (~1:5,000,000 and smaller). Polygons are accurate to ~1 km for Yukon and BC, and ~5 km for Alaska. More detailed geological data are available from both BC Geological Survey and Yukon Geological Survey websites. Descriptions of the terranes, their tectonic evolution and metallogeny can be found in Colpron et al. (2007), Nelson and Colpron (2007), Colpron and Nelson (2009), and references therein.


The terrane map project is a collaborative effort of the BC Geological Survey and Yukon Geological Survey.

 


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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-15
 

December 1, 2011  

 

Contents


New Publications:  Geoscience Map 2011-4 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-4:  Geology, Geochronology, Lithogeochemistry and Metamorphism of the Alice Lake Area, Northern Vancouver Island (NTS 092L/06 and part of 092L/03)  1:50 000 scale

G.T. Nixon, L.D. Snyder, G.J. Payie, S. Long, A. Finnie, A.J. Orr, R.M. Friedman, D.A. Archibald, M.J. Orchard, E.T. Tozer, T.P. Poulton and J.W. Taggart
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Maps/GeoscienceMaps/Pages/2011-4.aspx 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-4 (1:50 000-scale) is the fourth in a series of five new geological maps (Geoscience Maps 2011-1 to 2011-5) of northern Vancouver Island which together provide a revised Early Mesozoic stratigraphic framework and Mesozoic-Tertiary plutonic history for southern Wrangellia. Geoscience Map 2011-4 describes the geology, geochronology, lithogeochemistry and metamorphism of the Alice Lake area (NTS 092L/06 and part of 92L/03). The map area is underlain by a folded and faulted sequence of Late Triassic to Early Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Vancouver and Bonanza groups intruded by granitoids of the Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The deformed Triassic-Jurassic rocks are unconformably overlain by Cretaceous marine clastics and the eroded remnants of Tertiary (Neogene) volcanic edifices (Alert Bay volcanic unit). Intrusive counterparts of the Tertiary rocks include dikes and a granitoid pluton. The Late Triassic Quatsino limestone attains its maximum thickness (>900 m) and youngest age (Carnian to Early Norian) in the Alice Lake area. The limestone hosts significant base- and precious-metal skarn occurrences (e.g. the former Merry Widow and Old Sport mines) associated with Early Jurassic gabbroic and more leucocratic intrusions of the Island Plutonic Suite (Merry Widow Mountain Pluton). Skarn mineralization is also associated with the Early Pliocene Victoria Lake Pluton, the youngest member of the Late Miocene to Early Pliocene Klaskish Plutonic Suite. This composite pluton comprises an older granodiorite-porphyry phase (5.15 Ma) which has engulfed an enclave of Alert Bay volcanic rocks, and a younger quartz monzodiorite phase (4.6 Ma). Major structures in the area include steeply dipping, northerly and northwesterly-trending faults, and a younger intersecting set of northeasterly-trending structures related to the Brooks Peninsula Fault Zone. One such structure east of Neroutsos Inlet exhibits Early Pliocene or younger motion where it cuts the western margin of the Victoria Lake Pluton. Regional metamorphism is generally characterized by very low-grade mineral assemblages (prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies) except in the vicinity of faults and intrusive contacts where the rocks may reach upper greenschist to amphibolite grade, respectively.

 

 

 
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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-14
 

November 10, 2011  

 

Contents


New Publications:  GeoFile 2011-10 and Survey News:  New appointment 

 

GeoFile 2011-10:  Specialty (Rare) Metals in British Columbia, Canada

G.J. Simandl, E.A. Prussin and N. Brown
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-10.aspx 

 

GeoFile 2011-10 provides background information regarding Specialty Metals (“Rare Metals”) in British Columbia and can be considered a Specialty Metals primer for prospectors and geologists. The accompanying 1:2 000 000 scale map shows the location and geological setting of 106 rare metal occurrences. The GeoFile also lists 45 references on the subject.


Most of the primary occurrences are part of the belt-shaped British Columbia alkaline province which parallels the Rocky Mountain Trench.  They can be grouped into seven main geological categories based on the association between mineralization and host-rock or key lithological units: 1) Carbonatite/syenite-related deposits, 2) Peralkaline/alkaline intrusion-related deposits, 3) Skarns, 4) Pegmatites/granite hosted 5) Placers and paleoplacers, 6) Phosphate-hosted REE deposits and 7) Others. Aley carbonatite (niobium) and the Upper Fir carbonatite (niobium and tantalum) are the two most developed rare metal prospects approaching the feasibility study stage.

 
The Aley carbonatite (niobium) (094B 027) and the Upper Fir carbonatite (niobium and tantalum) (083D 035) are the two most developed rare metal prospects, approaching the feasibility study stage.  The less developed Wicheeda Lake rare earth element occurrence (093J 014) is also promising.  Carbonatite/syenite-related deposits appear to be the primary exploration targets for niobium and rare earth element exploration in British Columbia.

 

 

New Appointment


Tian Han

Senior Digital Information Geoscientist

BC Geological Survey

Ministry of Energy and Mines

 

  Tian Han has joined the BC Geological Survey as Senior Digital Information Geoscientist based in Victoria.  He brings with him extensive knowledge of database and application development, mapping using remote sensing techniques, and geospatial data modelling and management. 

 

Tian was recently with GeoBC working on the operational database management system designed to maintain and update BC’s topographic map.  He has a BSc in Physical Oceanography from the Ocean University of Qingdao, China and a MSc and PhD in Computer Science from the University of Victoria, Canada. 

 

Tian’s focus with the BC Geological Survey will be the maintenance of Bedrock Geology database available on the MapPlace and the development of remote sensing applications.

   

Tian’s Contact Information:

Phone:  250-952-0221

Email:  Tian.Han@gov.bc.ca


 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-13
 

November 3, 2011  

 

Geoscience Map 2011-03:  Geology, Geochronology, Lithogeochemistry and Metamorphism of the Mahatta Creek Area, Northern Vancouver Island (NTS 092L/05) 1:50 000 scale

G.T. Nixon, J.L. Hammack, J.V. Hamilton, H. Jennings, J.P. Larocque, A.J. Orr, R.M. Friedman, D.A. Archibald, R.A. Creaser, M.J. Orchard, J.W. Haggart, H.W. Tipper, E.T. Tozer, F. Cordey and C.A. McRoberts
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Maps/GeoscienceMaps/Pages/2011-3.aspx   

 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-3 (1:50 000-scale) is the third in a series of five new geological maps (Geoscience Maps 2011-1 to 2011-5) of northern Vancouver Island which together provide a revised Early Mesozoic stratigraphic framework and Mesozoic-Tertiary plutonic history for southern Wrangellia. Geoscience Map 2011-3 describes the geology, geochronology, lithogeochemistry and metamorphism of the Mahatta Creek area (NTS 092L/05). The map area is underlain by a folded and faulted sequence of Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Vancouver and Bonanza groups intruded by granitoids of the Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The deformed Triassic-Jurassic rocks are unconformably overlain by Cretaceous marine clastics and cut locally by Tertiary dikes. Of note stratigraphically is the radical change in thickness of the Late Triassic Quatsino limestone across the Mahatta Creek area from the west coast (~40 m thick) to the east (Neroutsos Inlet >900 m). A young Tertiary (Neogene) granodiorite, the Klaskish River Pluton, which is the founding member of the Late Miocene – Early Pliocene Klaskish Plutonic Suite, intrudes Late Triassic Karmutsen and Early Jurassic Bonanza (Le Mare Lake unit) volcanic rocks near the foot of the Brooks Peninsula. Recent exploration at the northern margin of this pluton has targeted a Cu-Mo porphyry system similar to mineralization at the former Island Copper mine hosted by a Middle Jurassic intrusion of the Island Plutonic Suite. Major northwesterly-trending faults with inferred vertical and/or stike-slip offsets occupy drift-filled valleys subparallel to the coast and appear to repeat Bonanza Group stratigraphy. One such fault system, the Le Mare Lake - Red Stripe Mountain faults, has demonstrably displaced stratigraphic units about 5 kilometres in a right-lateral sense. These structures are intersected by a set of steeply-dipping, northeasterly-trending, subparallel faults comprising the Brooks Peninsula Fault Zone, one of which (the Klaskish River Fault) cuts the Late Miocene Klaskish River Pluton. Regional metamorphism is generally characterized by very low-grade mineral assemblages (prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies) except in the vicinity of faults and intrusive contacts where the rocks may reach upper greenschist to amphibolite grade, respectively. 

 

Information Circular 2011-4:  Coal in British Columbia

A. Johal, B. Northcote and D. Lefebure

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/InformationCirculars/Pages/IC2011-4.aspx

 

This brochure briefly describes coal deposits in British Columbia, including the East Kootenay, Peace River, and Vancouver Island Coalfields.  It has a location map of selected coal deposits.

 

Coal contributes a very significant amount of revenue to the B.C. economy. The average annual value of coal production over the last 5 years has been just over $3 billion, which represents over half the total value of mineral production in the province during that period.


More than 90% of the coal produced in British Columbia is metallurgical coal. B.C.’s metallurgical coal products generally have the following favourable characterisitcs: medium-volatile bituminous; clean coal ash < 9.5% (air dried); low sulphur (0.4% to 0.6%); low coke oven pressure; high coke stability and coke strength after reaction; low to moderate base/acid ratios; and excellent blending characteristics.

 

 

 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-12
 

September 28, 2011  

  

BCGS GeoFile 2011-09:  Rare Earth Element Concentrations in Phosphate Deposits, Sulphur Mountain Formation, Northeastern British Columbia

G.J. Simandl, R. Fajber and F. Ferri
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-9.aspx 

This study covers concentrations of lanthanides and Y in phosphate deposits in northeastern British Columbia.  Fifty representative samples of phosphate rocks (containing from 0.1 to 29% P2O5), collected during the mid 1980's were re-analysed in 2009 for REEs using modern analytical technique (ICP-MS, following Li-metaborate fusion). They contain from 6 ppm to 972 ppm REE’s (not including Y) and from 5 ppm to 590 ppm Y.


The emphasis of this study is on the Sulphur Mountain formation (SMF) and more specifically at its Whistler member. In general, in decreasing order, Y, La, Nd and Ce are the most abundant REE’s in northeastern British Columbia. Samples from the Kechika formation are an exception because Ce, La, and Nd (in decreasing order) are more abundant than Y. 
Within the SMF, there is a good agreement between results obtained using ICP-MS and historical data for P and some of the REEs; however, results of historical La analyses are significantly lower than corresponding results obtained using modern ICP-MS.


Should any of the British Columbia phosphate deposits be considered as sources of phosphate raw material for fertilizer manufacturing, at current REE prices, the economic viability of REE recovery as a by-product of phosphate mining should be considered.

   

BC Geological Survey’s JoAnne Nelson co-authors updated “Geology of British Columbia, A Journey Through Time”.

 

JoAnne Nelson, Northern BC Manager and Senior Geologist in the Cordilleran Geoscience Section of the BCGS is a co-author on the new edition of the bestselling book, Geology of British Columbia published by Greystone Books.  Currently this book is #4 on the BC Bestsellers list and was recently featured in an article in the Vancouver Sun.  Congratulations JoAnne!  If you want to get your own copy, it is available through the publisher and most book retailers. 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mines and Mineral Resources Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-11
 

July 28, 2011  

Contents

 

New Publications: Open File 2010-09 and Geoscience Map 2011-2
Notice:  Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences Special Issue released

 

BCGS Open File 2010-09:  Geochemical Pathfinders to Drift Covered Copper-gold Sulphide Mineralization in central British Columbia

R. Lett
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/OpenFiles/2010/Pages/2010-9.aspx

 

Open File 2010-9 describes soil geochemical orientation surveys over the Mouse Mountain and Shiko Lake porphyry Cu-Au mineral occurrences and two other areas near Soda Creek and Alexandria. Bedrock in this part of British Columbia between Williams Lake and Quesnel is mainly glacial sediment covered and consists of Mesozoic-age rocks overlain by younger plateau basalts. The primary aim of the soil sampling was to examine the soil geochemical expression of porphyry Cu-Au and related sulphide mineralization in drift and barren bedrock covered areas.  In each survey area samples from different soil horizons were analysed for multi-elements by a range of techniques including instrumental neutron activation (INAA), aqua regia-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (aqua regia-ICPMS), Mobile Metal Ion leach (MMI) TM, Enzyme LeachSM, BioLeachSM and Soil Gas Hydrocarbons (SGH) and for soil pH and loss on ignition (LOI). Gold and other mineral grains were also identified and counted in the heavy mineral concentrate of C soil horizon samples.  

Gold, Cu, Mo and V soil anomalies outlined by soil sampling over the Mouse Mountain and Shiko Lake mineral properties are most likely caused by minerals entrained in a till deposited down-ice from bedrock hosted sulphide mineralization. Copper, Au, Ni and V by aqua regia-ICPMS show greatest anomaly contrast in the C soil horizon compared to the B and F-H horizons whereas Ag and Mo are more elevated in the F-H organic horizon. The number and relative shape of Au grains in the C soil sample heavy mineral concentrates complements the soil geochemistry in locating a buried bedrock source for the minerals. Comparison of SGH, multi element and pH patterns in the soil at Mouse Mountain and Shiko Lake suggest that the geochemistry may have been modified by a reduced chimney induced by oxidizing sulphides in bedrock. A model developed by interpreting all of the geochemical data displays the most likely relationship between the bedrock, drainage and soil geochemistry in areas where bedrock is concealed beneath a till veneer.

 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-02:  Geology, Geochronology, Lithogeochemistry and Metamorphism of the Quatsino-Port McNeill Area, Northern Vancouver Island (NTS 092L/11, and parts of 092L/05, 12 and 13)

G.T. Nixon, J.L. Hammack, V.M. Koyanagi, G.J. Payie, A.J. Orr, J.W. Haggart, M.J. Orchard, E.T.Tozer, R.M. Friedman, D.A. Archibald, J. Palfy and F. Cordey

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Maps/GeoscienceMaps/Pages/2011-2.aspx

Geoscience Map 2011-2 (1:50 000-scale) is the second in a series of five new geological maps (Geoscience Maps 2011-1 to 2011-5) of northern Vancouver Island which together provide a revised Early Mesozoic stratigraphic framework and Mesozoic-Tertiary plutonic history for southern Wrangellia. Geoscience Map 2011-2 describes the geology, geochronology, lithogeochemistry and metamorphism of the Quatsino – Port McNeill area (NTS 092L/11 and parts of 092L/05, 12 and 13). The map area is underlain by a folded and faulted sequence of Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Vancouver and Bonanza groups intruded by granitoids of the Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The deformed Triassic-Jurassic rocks are unconformably overlain by Cretaceous marine clastics and cut locally by Tertiary dikes and minor intrusions. Middle Jurassic intrusions of the Island Plutonic Suite (e.g. Rupert Inlet Pluton) are spatially and genetically associated with important calc-alkaline Cu-Au-Mo porphyry-style mineralization at the former Island Copper mine, as well as coeval high-sulphidation, base- and precious-metal epithermal prospects hosted by rhyolitic flows and pyroclastic rocks in the Pemberton Hills – Mount McIntosh area to the west (Geoscience Map 2011-1). Intriguingly, a dyke similar to the one associated with mineralization at Island Copper extends over 5 km east of the Rupert Inlet Pluton beneath a thick cover of glacial drift, as inferred from geophysical surveys, and remains to be drill-tested. A major, westerly-trending fault zone, the Holberg Fault, exposed in cliffs on the headland between Rupert and Holberg inlets, separates well-mineralized, Middle Jurassic intrusions and the largely coeval Holberg volcanic unit of the Bonanza Group from their Early Jurassic counterparts to the south. Radical changes in lowermost Jurassic stratigraphy are also evident across this structural corridor: a thick, predominantly subaerial, volcanic-volcaniclastic sequence (Le Mare Lake volcanic unit) south of the Holberg Fault largely correlates with a more condensed succession of intercalated, marine sedimentary and volcaniclastic strata north of the fault zone (Nahwitti River siltstone-wacke unit and lower part of the overlying Holberg volcanic unit). In the eastern part of the area, outliers of Neogene Alert Bay volcanic rocks rest unconformably on a downdropped block of Upper Cretaceous sedimentary strata of the Nanaimo Group. Regional metamorphism is generally characterized by very low-grade mineral assemblages (prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies) except in the vicinity of faults and intrusive contacts where the rocks may reach upper greenschist to amphibolite grade, respectively.

 

Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences Special Issue on “New Insights in Cordilleran Intermontaine Geoscience:  Reducing Exploration Risk in the Mountain Pine Beetle-Affected Area of British Columbia

The June issue of Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences is a Special Issue which presents a summary of geoscience research and investigations designed to address the negative economic impacts of the current mountain pine beetle infestation by attracting mineral and oil and gas exploration. 

 

The Geoscience for Mountain Pine Beetle programs were cooperatively led by Geological Survey of Canada, Geoscience BC, and the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, each drawing on their area of experience and expertise. Geoscience program components included using geophysics to see through the locally extensive cover of volcanic and glacial deposits, as well as augmenting the existing regional geoscience knowledge base with new baseline geology, mineral deposits, and geochemistry data.

 

To access this Special Issue, go to: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/toc/cjes/48/6

  

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-10
 

May 31, 2011 


 

BCGS Open File 2011-07:  Bedrock Geology of the Andrea Creek Area, part of NTS 104I/01

P. Schiarizza

 

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/OpenFiles/2011/Pages/2011-7.aspx

  

The Andrea Creek map area is located in northern British Columbia, about 100 km east of Dease Lake. It covers about 200 square kilometres and encompasses the transition between the Stikine Ranges of the Cassiar Mountains to the north and the Spatsizi Plateau to the south. Open File 2011-07 presents a 1:25 000-scale geologic map of this area based on fieldwork conducted in 2010. The map features new subdivisions of the Permo-Triassic Kutcho assemblage, a heterogeneous package of schists derived from felsic and mafic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks and associated felsic and mafic intrusions, which hosts the Kutcho Creek Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulphide occurrence (MINFILE 104I  060). The Kutcho assemblage is part of the King Salmon allochthon, which also includes a structurally underlying unit of metabasalt and serpentinite assigned to the Cache Creek Complex, and a Triassic-Jurassic metasedimentary succession that overlies the Kutcho assemblage across an erosional unconformity. The latter succession includes a local conglomerate unit containing clasts derived from the Kutcho assemblage, and overlying limestone, slate, siltstone and sandstone correlated with the regionally extensive Late Triassic Sinwa and Early to Middle Jurassic Inklin formations. The allochthon is bounded to the south by the north-dipping King Salmon thrust fault, and to the north by the Nahlin fault. Jurassic chert-pebble conglomerate of the Bowser Lake Group occurs in the footwall of the King Salmon fault, and serpentinized ultramafic rocks of the Cache Creek complex crop out on the north side of the Nahlin fault. The northwest-striking Kutcho fault truncates the King Salmon allochthon near the northeast edge of the map area, and juxtaposes it against undated plutonic rocks, mainly granodiorite and quartz diorite, which are part of the Quesnel terrane.


Operating funds for the 2010 mapping program were provided by the BC Geological Survey, a private-public partnership agreement with Kutcho Copper Corporation, the Geological Survey of Canada (EDGES component of the GEM program) and a partnership agreement with the University of Victoria.


Details and descriptions of the geologic units and structures within this map area can be found in:
Schiarizza, P. (2011): Geology of the Kutcho assemblage between Kutcho Creek and the Tucho River, northern British Columbia (NTS 104I/01); in Geological Fieldwork 2010, British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Paper 2011-1, pages 99-117


BC Geological Survey’s Assessment Report Team – Working For You.

In compliance with the Mineral Tenure Act (MTA) Regulations, results of mineral exploration programs conducted on mineral claims in British Columbia are submitted to the Ministry of Energy and Mines.  These assessment reports contain information on geology, geophysics, geochemistry, drilling, prospecting and physical work.  After a one-year confidentiality period, the reports become a valuable resource for planning mineral exploration investment, research studies, land-use planning and resource management.  The BC Geological Survey manages and maintains a library of over 32,000 mineral Assessment Reports dating from 1947 and describing exploration work costing over one and a half billion dollars.

 

The reports are reviewed in Victoria by two geologists, the veteran Allan Wilcox, Senior Mineral Assessment Geoscientist, and the recent Ted Fuller, Mineral Assessment Geoscientist.  In 2010, there were 922 reports approved and 638 assessment reports were moved to off confidential status.  The total value of annual work done and reported by industry was over $157 Million.  Between 65-75% of the reports were submitted in digital form; our goal is to have 90-95% submitted digitally.  We encourage all submitters to send their reports in digitally (PDF by email, CD-ROM, DVD, or USB drive).  Also, we encourage full submission of geophysical and geochemical data.  The most common errors in assessment report submissions are in the cost statement details and lack of geochemical result plots.

 

The benefits of digital submission:

  • the reports are of a higher quality and more efficient for digital use when posted to the internet;
  • result in a quicker turn around for the approval of the reports;
  • a cost in environmental savings to both the client (printing and mailing) and the government (storage, scanning and processing);
  • many clients currently compile reports in digital format already.

 

Allan Wilcox

Ted Fuller

 

Phone: (250) 952-0390  

Email:    Allan.Wilcox@gov.bc.ca               

Phone: (250) 952-0428
Email: Ted.Fuller@gov.bc.ca

 

 Back to top Top

 
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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-09
 

May 9, 2011 


 

BCGS GeoFile 2011-08:  Rare Earth Element Concentrations in Phosphate Deposits, Fernie Formation, Southeastern British Columbia, Canada

G.J. Simandl, R. Fajber and D. Grieve

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-8.aspx  

Sedimentary phosphate deposits are known to contain non-negligible concentrations of Rare Earth Elements (REE).  This conceptual study, based on 53 samples, gives an indication of the REE concentrations in phosphate rock occurrences located in southeast British Columbia.  The emphasis of this study is on the Fernie Formation which is covered by 31 samples.  This study indicates that there is good positive correlation between P2O5 content and REE as well as strong positive correlation between Yttrium and the lanthanides.  The Yttrium and neodymium concentrations of the Fernie Formation in particular are higher than expected.

 

Current prices of rare earth oxides are at or near an all time high.  Assuming sufficient resources could be established, a follow-up study to investigate the economic potential of REE extraction as a by-product of the transformation of phosphate rock into fertilizers may be justified.

 

Note:  The 2011 RGS database is now available to view on MapPlace with the Exploration Assistant Map.

 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-08
 

April 18, 2011 


 

BCGS Open File 2011-06: Till Geochemistry of the Colleymount Map Area (093L/01), West-central British Columbia

T. Ferbey

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/OpenFiles/2011/Pages/2011-6.aspx  

The silt plus clay-sized fraction of 84 basal till samples collected within the Colleymount map area (093L/01), located approximately 40 km southeast of Houston, BC, was analyzed for 37 elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), following an aqua regia digestion, and 35 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA).  An additional 18 basal till samples were collected for analysis of heavy metal concentrates and gold grain counts.  The spatial distribution of till samples elevated in Cu, Mo, Pb, Zn, Ag, Hg, Au, As, Sb, and visible gold grains are the focus of this study.  Detrial dispersal of commodity metals and pathfinder elements from known sources of mineralization is discussed (e.g., past producing Equity Silver mine) as are areas of geochemical interest. 

 

GeoFile 2011-07:  Regional Geochemical Survey Database
Ray Lett
http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/GF2011-7.aspx  The British Columbia Geological Survey, Ministry of Energy and Mines has been involved in reconnaissance-scale stream sediment and water surveys since 1976.  This program has generated high-quality stream and lake sediment and surface water data for geochemical surveys carried out across Canada.  In British Columbia the National Geochemical Reconnaissance (NGR) program, known as the Regional Geochemical Survey (RGS), has roughly 75 per cent of the province with stream sediment and stream water sampling at an average sample density of one sample per 13 square kilometres.  A
MicrosoftTM Access database contains all of the field and analytical information from 61,425 samples collected and/or
reanalysed by the BC Geological Survey of Canada and Geoscience BC from 1976 to March 2011.  The figure below shows the RGS sample coverage.

 

 

 

BCGS Open File 2011-04: East Hoodoo Mountain – Iskut River Geology (NTS 104B/14E, 11NE)

M.G. Mihalynuk, J.M. Logan and A. Zagorevski

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/OpenFiles/2011/Pages/2011-4.aspx   

Open File 2011-4 covers NTS map area 104B/14E and the northern part of 11E within the Iskut River area of northwestern British Columbia. This region is characterized by exceptional mineral endowment, as described by Mihalynuk et al. (2011, Geological Fieldwork 2010, Paper 2011-1): “… a 20km-wide corridor south of the Iskut River includes the Bronson Slope, Snip, Johnny Mountain, Eskay Creek and Rock and Roll deposits -all with past production or defined resources. These deposits formed in a surprisingly diverse set of environments ranging from intrusion hosted sulphide veins to shallow subaqueous hotspring settings. No deposits with past production or defined resources occur within a 20km corridor immediately north of the Iskut River, yet those farther afield include Galore Creek, Copper Canyon and Schaft Creek deposits that are hosted by alkalic and calc-alkalic porphyries. An obvious explanation for the dearth of deposits within the northern corridor is not forthcoming from existing geological maps; however, a significant part of the corridor has either never been systematically mapped or at least not since it was surveyed by Forrest Kerr in the 1920’s. A working partnership was established between the BC Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, the Geological Survey of Canada (under the auspices of the Geoscience for Energy and Minerals Strategy: GEMS), Pacific North West Capital Corp., and the University of Victoria to address this lack of public geologic knowledge through systematic mapping. Supplementary goals were to provide a more accurate geological setting for the Rock and Roll deposit and to evaluate the potential for similar precious metal rich polymetallic massive sulfide mineralization within the Iskut and adjacent regions. Our work was mainly focused where published mapping was entirely lacking: the eastern half of the Hoodoo Mountain mapsheet (NTS 104/14E). This mapsheet is bordered to the north by the Galore Creek mapsheet (104G/3) and to the east by Forrest Kerr mapsheet (104B/15), both covered by relatively recent regional geological surveys (Logan and Koyanagi, 1994, 104G/3, 4; and Logan et al., 2000, 104B/10, 15, 104G2, 7W).” 

 

 

Survey News

 

         The BC Geological Survey is once again part of the Ministry of Energy & Mines.

 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-07
 

March 16, 2011 


BCGS Geoscience Map 2011-1:  Geology, Geochronology, Lithogeochemistry and Metamorphism of the Holberg-Winter Harbour Area, Northern Vancouver Island (Parts of NTS 092L/05,12,13; 102I/08,09&16)

G.T. Nixon, J.L. Hammack, V.M. Koyanagi, L.D. Snyder, G.J. Payie, A. Panteleyev, N.W.D. Massey, J.V. Hamilton, A.J. Orr, R.M. Friedman, D.A. Archibald, J.W. Haggart, M.J. Orchard, E.T. Tozer, H.W. Tipper, T.P. Poulton, J. Palfy and F. Cordey 

 http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Maps/geosciencemaps/Pages/2011-1.aspx

Geoscience Map 2011-1 (1:50 000-scale), the first in a series of five new geological maps for northern Vancouver Island, describes the geology, geochronology, lithogeochemistry and metamorphism of the Holberg-Winter Harbour area (parts of NTS 092L/05, 12, 13; 102I/08, 09 and 16). The map area is underlain by a folded and faulted sequence of Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Vancouver and Bonanza groups intruded by granitoids of the Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The deformed Triassic-Jurassic rocks are unconformably overlain by Cretaceous marine clastics and cut locally by Tertiary minor intrusions. Middle Jurassic intrusions of the Island Plutonic Suite (e.g., Hushamu Creek and Goodspeed River plutons) are spatially and genetically associated with important calc-alkaline Cu-Au-Mo porphyry-style mineralization similar to the deposit at the former Island Copper mine, as well as coeval high-sulphidation base- and precious-metal epithermal prospects in the Pemberton Hills – Mount McIntosh area. A major northwesterly-trending structure along Holberg-Rupert inlets, the Holberg Fault, separates the well-mineralized Middle Jurassic intrusions and broadly coeval Holberg volcanic unit of the Bonanza Group from their Early Jurassic counterparts to the west. Regional metamorphism is generally characterized by very low grade mineral assemblages (prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies) except in the vicinity of faults and intrusive contacts where the rocks reach upper greenschist to amphibolite grade. 

 
 

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British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-06
 

March 14, 2011

 
Vancouver Island Geoscience Data Release Event
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
2:00 p.m.
Port Hardy Council Chambers
7360 Columbia St., Port Hardy 
 


BCGS Geoscience Map 2011-1:  Geology, Geochronology, Lithogeochemistry and Metamorphism of the Holberg-Winter Harbour Area, Northern Vancouver Island (Parts of NTS 092L/05,12,13; 102I/08,09&16)

 

G.T. Nixon, J.L. Hammack, V.M. Koyanagi, L.D. Snyder, G.J. Payie, A. Panteleyev, N.W.D. Massey, J.V. Hamilton, A.J. Orr, R.M. Friedman, D.A. Archibald, J.W. Haggart, M.J. Orchard, E.T. Tozer, H.W. Tipper, T.P. Poulton, J. Palfy and F. Cordey 

Available online March 16th at 2pm from the BCGS Publications Catalogue

 

 

Geoscience Map 2011-1 (1:50 000-scale), the first in a series of five new geological maps for northern Vancouver Island, describes the geology, geochronology, lithogeochemistry and metamorphism of the Holberg-Winter Harbour area (parts of NTS 092L/05, 12, 13; 102I/08, 09 and 16). The map area is underlain by a folded and faulted sequence of Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Vancouver and Bonanza groups intruded by granitoids of the Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The deformed Triassic-Jurassic rocks are unconformably overlain by Cretaceous marine clastics and cut locally by Tertiary minor intrusions. Middle Jurassic intrusions of the Island Plutonic Suite (e.g., Hushamu Creek and Goodspeed River plutons) are spatially and genetically associated with important calc-alkaline Cu-Au-Mo porphyry-style mineralization similar to the deposit at the former Island Copper mine, as well as coeval high-sulphidation base- and precious-metal epithermal prospects in the Pemberton Hills – Mount McIntosh area. A major northwesterly-trending structure along Holberg-Rupert inlets, the Holberg Fault, separates the well-mineralized Middle Jurassic intrusions and broadly coeval Holberg volcanic unit of the Bonanza Group from their Early Jurassic counterparts to the west. Regional metamorphism is generally characterized by very low grade mineral assemblages (prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies) except in the vicinity of faults and intrusive contacts where the rocks reach upper greenschist to amphibolite grade. 

 

Geoscience BC will also be releasing Report 2011-4 which contains results of the 2010 Vancouver Island Reanalysis of moss-trapped stream sediment samples plus previously published data for gold, fluorine and loss on ignition in stream sediments and fluoride, uranium and pH in stream water and there will be a poster display of Geoscience BC's Northern Vancouver Island Compilation Project.  The geoscientists responsible for each of these projects will be on hand to discuss their projects and results.

  

 
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British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-05
 

March 7, 2011

 

 

Contents


New Publications:  Information Circular 2011-01 and Information Circular 2011-02 

 

BCGS Information Circular 2011-01:  British Columbia Mines and Mineral Exploration Overview 2010

 

K. Hancock, B. Northcote, D. Grieve, B. Madu and P. Wojdak

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/MineralExplorationReview/Documents/EX-OVERVIEW_IC2011-1.pdf     

 

British Columbia's coal and mineral resources are strategically located to be a significant asset for the international mining industry, particularly as a supplier for North American and Asian markets.  The province has well-defined potential for a wide variety of minerals and deposit types.  The geoscience database is extensive and easily accessed and the provincial government is committed to aggressively improving that data and encouraging new developments.  With attractive energy costs, a well developed, all-weather highway system, rail links and a number of deep-water ports, British Columbia has the infrastructure to cost-effectively get coal, minerals and resulting products to markets.

 

 

BCGS Information Circular 2011-02: Rare Metals in British Columbia

A. Johal, B. Northcote and K. Hancock

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/InformationCirculars/Pages/IC2011-2.aspx  

This brochure briefly describes rare metal deposits in British Columbia, including the Aley, Upper Fir, Wicheeda, Carbo, Mount Copeland and Mount Bisson deposits.  It has a location map of selected rare metal deposits.

 

The MINFILE database lists over 90 rare metal occurrences hosted by carbonatites, nepheline syenites, rare element enriched pegmatites, skarns, massive sulphide deposits, sedimentary phosphate deposits and placer deposits.  In approximately 25 of these occurrences, rare metals are considered the primary commodities.  The recent surge in interest has added a number of new occurrences.  To date, only a handful of prospects are developed beyond very early stage exploration.

 

 

Note:  The BCGS Open File 2011-1: Operating Mines and Selected Major Exploration Projects in BC 2010 has been updated and is available for download online

 
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British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-04
 

February 22, 2011

 
 

Contents


BCGS GeoFile 2011-06 

 

BCGS GeoFile 2011-06:  Hand-held, Portable XRF in Exploration for Carbonate-hosted Sulphide and Nonsulphide Pb-Zn Deposits

G.J. Simandl, S. Paradis, R. Fajber and N. Rogers

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-6.aspx  

Carbonate-hosted nonsulphide base metal mineralization is derived from sulphide deposits by supergene processes.  In the field such occurrences can be described as ‘red ores’ or ‘white ores’.  Red ores consist mainly of Fe-oxyhydroxides: goethite, hematite, and hemimorphite, as well as minor smithsonite, hydrozincite and cerussite  (+/- vestiges of galena ). They are difficult to distinguish macroscopically from barren gossans. White ores consist mainly of hemimorphite, smithsonite, and hydrozincite, as well as minor Fe-oxyhydroxides. In some cases white ores are difficult to distinguish from the enclosing carbonate host rock.

 

Samples from the red and white nonsulphide mineralization were analysed first using portable hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and secondly using laboratory ICP-MS/ICP-ES methods (following lithium metaborate fusion).  Comparison between the methods indicates that the portable hand-held XRF is a useful field tool in exploration for carbonate-hosted nonsulphide mineralization. The instrument is able to distinguish between barren, moderately mineralized and high grade mineralized samples; making it useful where rapid decisions are needed (on a drill site, during helicopter supported geological work, or for semi-quantitative verification of ore grades at a mine site). Our tests also indicate that currently available portable hand-held XRF analysis is not a substitute for analytical laboratory methods (such as ICP-MS/ICP-ES or assays).

 

 

Property File database now features more than 26,800 documents online!

During 2010 Property File, a collection of over 63,000 unique industry documents and maps, continued to grow.  Recent Property File donations were made by Andre Panteleyev, Tom Schroeter, Ken Dawson and the estate of W.G. Hainsworth.  As of January 2011, 26,882 property file documents were available online, including 396 Falconbridge, 1924 Cyprus-Anvil, 304 Chevron, 479 Placer Dome, 1328 Rimfire, 2969 Mines Plans, 5740 Tom Schroeter project files and 13732 Library items.  These are retrieved through the Property File Search application or through links from MINFILE.

 

 
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British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-03
 

February 10, 2011

 

Contents


New Publications:  GeoFile 2011-02, GeoFile 2011-05 originally shown at Roundup 2011

   

BCGS GeoFile 2011-02: Final Frontier in the Golden Triangle: East Hoodoo Mountain Area

M.G. Mihalynuk, J.M. Logan and Z. Zagorevski

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-2.aspx  

The Iskut River area of northwestern BC is characterized by exceptional mineral endowment, it is mostly enveloped by the fabled “Golden Triangle”. Westflowing lower Iskut River marks the northern edge of the south-pointing Golden Triangle. Rocks which host stratabound mineralization, such as at the Rock and Roll deposit, are apparently barren north of the river. There is no obvious geological explanation for the dearth of deposits north of the Iskut River edge of the Golden Triangle. However, a reason for the lack of deposits in the Hoodoo Mtn area (104B/14) may arise from the lack of a geological framework; much of the area has never been systematically mapped. A working partnership was established between the BC Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands, the Geological Survey of Canada (GEMS), Pacific North West Capital Corp. and the University of Victoria to address this lack of public geologic knowledge.

 

BCGS GeoFile 2011-05: Biogeochemical Exploration Vectors in search of Carbonatite, Blue River, British Columbia

G.J. Simandl, R. Fajber, C.E. Dunn, B. Ulry and J. Dahrouge

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-5.aspx

Coniferous trees represent suitable sampling media in the exploration for carbonatites and related rare earth elements (REE), Ta, Nb, phosphate and fluorspar mineralization referred to in the British Columbia “Carbonatite Deposit profile N01” (Birkett and Simandl, 1999). 


Twenty four samples of twigs with needles from coniferous trees (Subalpine Fir and White Spruce) were collected over the Upper Fir Ta, Nb and apatite-bearing carbonatite. The results indicate that carbonatite is detectable by biogeochemical methods. Light rare earth elements (LREE), Y, Zr and P are good exploration vectors for REE and apatite mineralization; whereas Ta and Nb are direct indicators for their own ores. Ta is found in detectable concentrations only in White Spruce twigs (41% of samples), and mainly those directly overlying mineralization, concentrations range from 0.001 to 0.003 ppm Ta. Nb concentrations are higher than those of Ta; concentrations range from 0.02 to 0.24 ppm Nb in White Spruce twigs, 0.00496 to 0.070814 ppm Nb in White Spruce needles (ash values normalized to dry weights), and 0.012011 ppm to 0.030214 ppm in Subalpine Fir needles (ash values normalized to dry weights).

 

 

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British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-02


 

January 24, 2011

 
 

Contents


New publications:  BCGS Fieldwork 2010, Open File 2011-03GeoFile 2011-01, GeoFile 2011-03, GeoFile 2011-04  

  

Geological Fieldwork 2010:   A Summary of Field Activities and Current Research

Paper 2011-01 http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Fieldwork/Pages/GeologicalFieldwork2010.aspx

 

The annual Geological Fieldwork:  A Summary of Field Activities and Current Research volume is the primary publication for reporting results of the previous season's mapping and research activities.  It contains geoscience articles produced by BC Geological Survey staff and external authors on topics relevant to British Columbia.  This is the premier annual publication for the BC Geological Survey.

 

BCGS Open File 2011-03:  Geology of the mid-coast region of British Columbia near Kelmtu (Parts of Laredo Sound map area, NTS 103A/08,09,15,16)

J.L. Nelson, L.J. Diakow, S. Karl, J.B. Mahoney, G.E. Gehrels, M. Pecha and C. van Staal

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/OpenFiles/2011/Pages/2011-3.aspx.

 

BCGS GeoFile 2011-01: Lithogeochemical results from the Iskut Project 2010

M.G. Mihalynuk and J.M. Logan

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-1.aspx.

 

BCGS GeoFile 2011-03: Regional to Property-Scale Drift Prospecting Surveys in British Columbia

T. Ferbey

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-3.aspx.

 

BCGS GeoFile 2011-04: Geology and Geochemistry of Carbonate-hosted Nonsulphide Zn-Pb Mineralization in Southern and Central BC

S. Paradis, G.J. Simandl, H. Keevil and M. Raudsepp

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/GeoFiles/Pages/2011-4.aspx.

 

 
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British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands
Mining and Minerals Division
BC Geological Survey

Release Notification 2011-01


 

January 24, 2011

 
 

Contents

Two new publications:  Open File 2011-01 and Exploration and Mining in BC 2010 

Upcoming Releases and Events:

  • Geological Fieldwork 2010, January 24th at 12:30pm
  • Open File 2011-03, January 24th at 12:30pm
  • GeoFile 2011-03, January 24th at 12:30pm
  • JoAnne Nelson, Paul Schiarizza and Mitch Mihalynuk will be presenting their talks in the Public Geoscience           Session at Roundup on the morning of January 25th.

 

Visit staff at the MFML booth or the Seymour Room during Roundup.

 

Operating Mines and Selected Major Exploration Projects in British Columbia - 2010

D. Grieve, B. Madu, B. Northcote, P. Wojdak, S. Meredith-Jones and P. Desjardins

Open File 2011-01

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/OpenFiles/2011/Pages/2011-1.aspx

This Provincial Map shows the location of major exploration projects and producing metal, coal and industrial mineral mines in 2010.  

 

Exploration and Mining in British Columbia 2010

D. Grieve, J. Fredericks, B. Madu, B. Northcote and P. Wojdak

http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/ExplorationinBC/Pages/2010.aspx

   

 
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New Appointment


Kirk Hancock

Acting Director, British Columbia Mineral Development Office

BC Geological Survey

Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands

 

Kirk Hancock has started a temporary assignment as the Acting Director of the British Columbia Mineral Development Office located in Vancouver. He brings more than twenty years experience with government and industry related to the province’s mineral industry. The BC Mineral Development Office is the first point of contact for exploration and mining company personnel considering exploring or investing in the province and plays a major role in providing technical information to international investors. As the Director, Kirk will also act as an important link between the provincial government and the minerals industry.  

Kirk has a long history with the BC Geological Survey (BCGS), beginning in 1987

upon his graduation from the UBC Department of Geology and a summers mapping

with the G.S.C.  He worked with the BCGS for 10 years in field mapping, industrial mineral studies and mineral deposits work.  He then moved over to the private sector to work as a senior project geologist and then exploration manager with several junior companies before becoming an independent consultant. During this time he worked in British Columbia, Nevada, Northern Mexico and in Central Honduras.  Project work focussed on different deposit model types including Carlin-type gold, Manto-chimney base metals, porphyry copper, porphyry molybdenum, mesothermal gold veins and gold skarns.  In 2005, Kirk rejoined the BCGS to become a senior research member of the MapPlace and mineral assessment team providing both technical expertise as well as helping with client relations.

Kirk has worked in most areas of the province with significant time spent in the Quesnel Trough, the Iskut and Atlin areas, plus the southeast Rocky Mountains.  This field experience is coupled with an outstanding knowledge of the province’s geoscience databases.  He looks forward to working with Bruce Northcote of the BC Mineral Development Office to provide technical geoscience advice to the ministry’s many clients.

 

Kirk’s Contact Information:

Phone:  (604) 660 3332

Email:  kirk.hancock@gov.bc.ca

 

Posting Permanent Position:

The Ministry will have a competition to fill the Director position on a permanent basis.  The opening was created when Jay Fredericks, Director of the BC Mineral Development Office moved to the private sector to become Vice President of Hathor Exploration Ltd.  Jay’s many contributions are recognized by both his government and industry colleagues.  If you are interested in more information about the Director position, please contact Dave Lefebure, Chief Geologist at Dave.Lefebure@gov.bc.ca.

 
Questions or to update your contact information please contact the BC Geological Survey:
Email:  Geological.Survey@gov.bc.ca    Tel: 250-952-0372          Fax:  250-952-0381