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Ministry of Energy Mines and Responsible for Core Review

104A Geological Legend

 

Bowser Lake

INTRUSIVE ROCKS

CENOZOIC
TERTIARY
   EOCENE
B,P HYDER DIKE SWARMS: Includes Boundary (B) and Portland Canal (P) dike swarms: plagioclase porphyritic, biotite or biotite + hornblende granodiorite
Tqm Quartz monzonite
Tfp Feldspar porphyry (probably includes some Hazelton Group extrusive or intrusive rocks)
MESOZOIC
JURASSIC TO CRETACEOUS

JKdi

Diorite, hornblende diorite
JURASSIC
     EARLY JURASSIC (?)

Jgd

Granodiorite
TRIASSIC

Trdi

(Augite) diorite (includes some Hazelton Group volcanic flows)

STRATIFIED ROCKS

CENOZOIC
QUATERNARY
     PLEISTOCENE AND HOLOCENE

Qs

Unconsolidated surficial clastic sediments and glacial deposits
MESOZOIC
JURASSIC TO CRETACEOUS
LOWER CRETACEOUS
BOWSER LAKE GROUP (JKBL- KDC)
KDC DEVILS CLAW FORMATION: Non-marine conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone and shale
IKM McEVOY FORMATION: Non-marine shale, siltstone, coal, sandstone and conglomerate
MIDDLE JURASSIC TO LOWER CRETACEOUS
IKJc CURRIER FORMATION: Non-marine to marginal marine shale, siltstone, sandstone, coal and carbonate
JKBL UNDIVIDED: Mainly shale, sandy mudstone and sandstone (may correlate, in part, with the Jurassic Ashman Formation south of the map area)
TRIASSIC TO JURASSIC
HAZELTON GROUP (TrJH- mJSR)
MIDDLE JURASSIC

mJSR

SALMON RIVER FORMATION: Siltstone, greywacke sandstone, some calcarenite, minor limestone, argillite conglomerate, littoral deposits (locally includes the underlying Lower to Middle Jurassic Mount Dilworth Formation, comprising rhyolite, rhyolite breccia, crystal and lithic tuff. Only 30 metres thick, the Mount Dilworth Formation effectively lies along the contact line between the Salmon River and Betty Creek formations)
LOWER JURASSIC

IJBC

BETTY CREEK FORMATION: Pillow lava and breccia; andesitic and basaltic flows; green, red, purple and black volcanic breccia, conglomerate, sandstone and siftstone; crystal and lithic tuff; siltstone; minor chert and limestone
UPPER TRIASSIC TO LOWER JURASSIC

TrJUR

UNUK RIVER FORMATION: Green, red and purple volcanic breccia, conglomerate, sandstone and siltstone; crystal and lithic tuff; sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, chert, minor coal
UPPER TRIASSIC TO MIDDLE JURASSIC

TrJH

UNDIVIDED: Mainly green, purple and red andesitic breccia, tuff and conglomerate; minor rhyolite, chert, greywacke, limestone, shale, siltstone (stratigraphic position uncertain)

Geological base and legend compiled from:

Cookenboo, H.O. and Bustin, R.M. (1991): Coal-Bearing Facies in the Northern Bowser Basin (104A, H); B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Geological Fieldwork 1990, Paper 1991- 1, pp. 415-418.

Geological Survey of Canada (1957): Stikine River Area, Cassiar District, British Columbia; Operation Stikine, Map 9-1957, Scale 1:253,440.

Grove, E.W. (1986): Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Unuk River-Salmon River-Anyox area; B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Bulletin 63, 152 pp.

Souther, J.G., Brew, D.A. and Okulitch, A.V. (compilers) (1979): Iskut River; Geological Survey of Canada, Map 1418A, Scale 1:1,000,000.

For more detaIled geology of the extreme southwestern corner of the map area see the following:

Alldrick, D.J. (1987): Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Salmon River Valley, Stewart Area (104A, B); B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Open File 1987-22, 1 map sheet, Scale 1 :50 000.

Alldrick, D.J. and Britton, J.M. (1988): Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Sulphurets Area (104A/B, 12; 104B/8, 9); B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Open File 1988-4, 1 map sheet, Scale 1:50 000.

See BOWSER LAKE (104A) Summary Sheet for an overview of the map area and additional regional references.

Positions of all geological contacts are approximate. In the case of an apparent disagreement between an occurrence’s geological location on the map and its stratigraphic setting given in the MINFILE documentation, the latter should be given priority.